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Scientific Drilling The open-access ICDP and IODP journal
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A workshop was held in Basel, Switzerland, to discuss the scientific opportunities for evolutionary biology, paleobiology and paleoecology of a drilling project at Lake Tanganyika, one of the oldest and most biodiverse lakes on Earth. A record of the numerous endemic organisms collected from the lake coupling body fossils, environmental history and potentially aDNA or ancient protein records would be transformative for understanding evolution in isolation and the biogeographic history of Africa.
Articles | Volume 22
Sci. Dril., 22, 43–48, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-22-43-2017
Sci. Dril., 22, 43–48, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-22-43-2017

Workshop report 31 May 2017

Workshop report | 31 May 2017

Scientific Drilling at Lake Tanganyika, Africa: A Transformative Record for Understanding Evolution in Isolation and the Biological History of the African Continent, University of Basel, 6–8 June 2016

Andrew S. Cohen and Walter Salzburger

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Short summary
A workshop was held in Basel, Switzerland, to discuss the scientific opportunities for evolutionary biology, paleobiology and paleoecology of a drilling project at Lake Tanganyika, one of the oldest and most biodiverse lakes on Earth. A record of the numerous endemic organisms collected from the lake coupling body fossils, environmental history and potentially aDNA or ancient protein records would be transformative for understanding evolution in isolation and the biogeographic history of Africa.
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