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Scientific Drilling The open-access ICDP and IODP journal
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A new annually resolvable sedimentary record of southern hemisphere climate has been recovered from Lake Ohau, South Island, New Zealand. The Lake Ohau Climate History (LOCH) Project acquired cores from two sites that preserve an 80 m thick sequence of laminated mud that accumulated since the lake formed ~ 17 000 years ago. Cores were recovered using a purpose-built barge and drilling system designed to recover soft sediment from relatively thick sedimentary sequences at water depths up to 100 m.
SD | Articles | Volume 24
Sci. Dril., 24, 41–50, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-24-41-2018
Sci. Dril., 24, 41–50, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-24-41-2018

Progress report 22 Oct 2018

Progress report | 22 Oct 2018

A high-resolution climate record spanning the past 17 000 years recovered from Lake Ohau, South Island, New Zealand

Richard H. Levy et al.

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Cited articles

Barnes, E. A. and Polvani, L.: Response of the Midlatitude Jets, and of Their Variability, to Increased Greenhouse Gases in the CMIP5 Models, J. Climate, 26, 7117–7135, https://doi.org/10.1175/jcli-d-12-00536.1, 2013. 
Barrell, D., Anderson, B., and Denton, G.: Glacial geomorphology of the central South Island, New Zealand, GNS Science, GNS Science monograph 27, p. 81 + map (5 sheets) + legend (1 sheet), 2011. 
Chang, E. K. M., Guo, Y., and Xia, X.: CMIP5 multimodel ensemble projection of storm track change under global warming, J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos., 117, D23118, https://doi.org/10.1029/2012JD018578, 2012. 
Cossu, R., Forrest, A. L., Roop, H. A., Dunbar, G. B., Vandergoes, M. J., Levy, R. H., Stumpner, P., and Schladow, S. G.: Seasonal variability in turbidity currents in Lake Ohau, New Zealand, and their influence on sedimentation, Mar. Freshwater Res., 67, 1725–1739, https://doi.org/10.1071/MF15043, 2016. 
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Short summary
A new annually resolvable sedimentary record of southern hemisphere climate has been recovered from Lake Ohau, South Island, New Zealand. The Lake Ohau Climate History (LOCH) Project acquired cores from two sites that preserve an 80 m thick sequence of laminated mud that accumulated since the lake formed ~ 17 000 years ago. Cores were recovered using a purpose-built barge and drilling system designed to recover soft sediment from relatively thick sedimentary sequences at water depths up to 100 m.
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