Articles | Volume 25
Sci. Dril., 25, 35–46, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-25-35-2019
Sci. Dril., 25, 35–46, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/sd-25-35-2019
Science report
12 Jun 2019
Science report | 12 Jun 2019

SUSTAIN drilling at Surtsey volcano, Iceland, tracks hydrothermal and microbiological interactions in basalt 50 years after eruption

Marie D. Jackson et al.

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Cited articles

Adkins, S.: Volcanic cores from Iceland's youngest island, Coring Magazine, 6, 38–39, 2018. 
Alexandersson, T.: The sedimentary xenoliths from Surtsey: turbidites indicating shelf growth, Surtsey Res. Progr. Rept., 6, 101–116, 1972. 
ASTM C97/C97M-18: Standard Test Methods for Absorption and Bulk Specific Gravity of Dimension Stone, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, https://doi.org/10.1520/C0097_C0097M-18, 2018. 
Baldursson, S. and Ingadóttir, Á.: Nomination of Surtsey for the UNESCO World Heritage List, Icelandic Institute of Natural History, Reykjavik, 2007. 
Einarsson, P.: Plate boundaries, rifts and transforms in Iceland, Jökull, 58, 35–58, 2008. 
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Short summary
Three new cored boreholes through Surtsey volcano, an isolated island in southeastern Iceland, provide fresh insights into understanding how explosive submarine volcanism and the earliest alteration of basaltic deposits proceed in a pristine oceanic environment. The still-hot volcano was first sampled through a drill core in 1979. The time-lapse drill cores record the changing geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological, and material properties of the basalt 50 years after eruptions terminated.